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the lawful property of southern families, namely their slaves. and there was no compromise that could erase those tensions. they had been trying to compromise the issue of slavery for three generations. they compromised over slavery when they wrote the constitution. they compromised over slavery when they passed the northwest -- opening the upper midwest. they compromised over slavery in 1820 with the famous missouri compromise. they compromised over slavery in 1850 with the fugitive slave act and in 1854 with the kansas/nebraska act. the dred scott opinion of the supreme court was supposed to be compromised, resolving the issue of slavery. they had tried and tried and tried to compromise. it had not worked and that is why the crisis came. if one nation sharing the same congress, operating under the same laws, could not compromise the issue, how could two nations side-by-side, sharing these vital arteries of commerce and communication, how could they hope to resolve the issue? and what's more, lincoln understood that if secession managed one success there would not be illogical into it. we
before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially rewrite legislation changing the plain text that congress passed in order to declare obamacare constitutional, which is a little scary, that that highest justices in the land would take that sort of activist role and you mentioned france, dan, that's scary. the back drop of this whole presidential year is europe. we know where the path leads. and the turmoil and welfare states and how unsustainability and the high unemployment that comes with them and that was the back drop of our presidential campaign. >> paul: okay, the voters said, yeah, we're going to keep moving in that direction, kim. i mean, how, what do you think the electorate is here, behind the choices that jason just suggested they might be? >> barack obama won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. so if you went
of privileges. whether criminal law or otherwise. other privileges as well. as an office, we were required to be under certain things. but i really touch on areas that i did not have to run my butt by the treasury department in any way shape or form. they weren't happy about the hard truth that i tried to deliver in this book. so it really wasn't -- i really didn't do anything or go in any of those areas. you know, sometimes a little frustrating because there were things i wanted to explore, but i thought it was safer and easier to come nowhere close outline. i felt i could tell the story without having to just go there. so i think that was it. next steps, right now, i'm teaching at nyu school of law. which i am just enjoying and loving. they were so supportive of the process of me writing this book. i'm not sure what's next. but it's been a crazy and wonderful ride. even though i had a hard time in washington in a lot of respects, i would never give back a second of the time. serving the country and went out to do,, i feel blessed and fortunate. working with the amazing men and women who
walker. he put through his right to work laws. he didn't want a recall. he was an inspiration for republican governors. it's a move gone all over the country. >> best politician bill clinton, who in a single speech at the democratic national convention injected energy and enthusiasm into the voters. >> herman cain was the leading republican contender. however, he was also the worst politician, but i'll get to that later. >> i had a long shot in naming chris christie because he firmed up his base in a democratic state. and i think at a time when the republicans now are seeing a resurgence among their moderates. i think in the long run he may prove to be the big winner of the year. >> these are all very interesting choices but they are all domestic. the best politician of 2012 was german chancellor angela merkle. she had to walk a tightrope between her german voters who do not favor bailing out europe and the european union. best politician, angela. you got it? you can write that down. pat, put it in your column. worst politician. >> susan rice. she was fed these phony talking p
. >> nancy, you went to harvard law school. you went to oxford. you could have done so many things. how did you end up at the white house? >> i could have done many things and i have done many things. i started off as a lawyer. i am from a small town. my mom raised three kids on her own. she did not have a college education, but she is viewed in me that i could have one. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know that she wanted me to do very well in school. when i would talk to her about one in to work in the white house sunday or being interested in politics, she would say you have to study hard and get good grades because you will need a scholarship. i cannot afford it, but she never said i could not do it. that was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i went to law school. in the early 1980's, when i got out of law school and was going around to law firms, even at that point, there were not many women in law firms. people would sit me down and say, do you understand that if we take you into this law firm, you will have to try cases? [laughter] t
no people were injured. gregg: yeah, there you go. heather: with the new year comes more than 200 new laws going on the books and trace will be back with that and a breakdown for us. gregg: just when you thought it was over, new warnings of another little storm heading for the storm-ravaged northeast. we'll get a live report in minutes. heather: and new controversy over a move by russia's president that critics say is playing politics with the lives of orphans. what it could mean for americans who want to adopt overseas. our legal panel debates. i greg: welcome back. jenna: a fox extreme weather alert. this is no system bringing heavy wind and rain and snow to the northeast for dumping as much as 1.5 feet of snow on new york and pennsylvania. after devastating parts of the golf coast with tornadoes speak to the system is moving slowly north. but don't put away the snow shovels yet. there is another storm on the way. jenna: maria molina joins us with the very latest. reporter: you guys are right. we have another snow system that will dump a lot more snow over the northeast, and it actually
to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my grandson was a very normal child. when he was 18 months to two years old, he got nine shots in one day. seven of which had thimerosol, mercury. it is a preservative. in 1929 it was tested on the 29 people who had meningitis. they said that the mercury had no impact so they started using solutions.halmologic when children get a few vaccinations, it did not have a huge impact but they started to get as many as 25 or 30 before they get to the first grade. my grandson got nine in one day and he became artistic, banging his head against the wall. then diary and constipation -- diarrhea and constipation. he was doing terrible. i was not aware of autism and all but i was chairman of the committee that did the investigation so i started to looking into with health and human services and the food and drug administration and that is where i had four years of hearings on that and i became convinced that women -- that mercury, women w
. with regard to legal immigration, think the rule ofn law is remaining the best way oe making sure that people don't come into the country illegally. the risk of an amnesty that is basically all that we are talking about unfortunately is amnesty. every amnesty in the past weather in europe or in then united states has had the effect of attracting more people in the country illegally in the hopes of a future amnesty. lou: years ago i started talking about a rational, humane immigration policy that would take intocy account all of the concerns about displacement of those who were in this country illegally, a due process make a determination of how work permits and legal status occurred. that is not the activist groups in this country t insist upon one thing, it is remarkable demand in my eyes, they insist upon amnesty and this president is insisting upon amnesty. what is your reaction? >> what i worry about most is not amnesty, but incredibly successful campaign toma stigmatize any immigration enforcementti whatsoever.ha when you have opposition across the country to a program called s
because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma attached to this type of issue which in my opinion should be a public health issue. it's a public health issue for a certain segment of the community and should be a public health community issue for everybody
how the two connect. well, this is my mother-in-law, and she was as old as the year, so she was 24 in 1924, when she was married. and i have a feeling that perhaps this was a special wedding present from her husband. i just wonder. it isn't the sort of thing parents would give. oh, no. far too-- far too flippant i would have thought for a parent. but, um, for a husband maybe. it might have been a wedding present. now, let's just have a look here, because i can see on a lot of the pots and the devices and the buffer and so on there's the initial "n." "n." she was nell. wonderful. her name was ellen but she was known as nell. and the hallmarks... well, they're different. i can see their different. they're very tiny. not easy to see. i can see they date from about 1926 through to about 1929. oh, so-- so it couldn't have been a wedding present, so, not a wedding present, but maybe an anniversary present or the birth-of- a-child present. but tell me a little bit about nell. i mean, it's lovely to hear a daughter-in-law saying that she was a lovely mother-in-law.
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, y
they cannot afford to repay. the national consumer law attorney took part in the discussion examining student loan debt and its effects on both the student and the parents. this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> with a degree come student debt. i'm really happy to be here tonight. it is great to take some time, to have this many and this whole set up to discuss these things, and these issues. i think propublica does a fantastic job with this, as they do with everything. we are happy to have a fantastic panel with the array of experts you would want to be discussing this issue. marion has been covering this for propublica, and a month ago had a fantastic piece that would-be the result of months of investigation of the debt burden on parents. that is an aspect that not a lot of people have been talking about. although you may have read about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a scholarship." next to him, an attorney with the national consumer law center and
was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cases? >> [laughter] >> i said that is what i wanted to do and was excited about it. i have clients in the beginning, i would go in to meet them. afterwards, one of my partners would say that they say that was not what i expected. he did not know there was going to be a lady lawyer on this case. but i really liked trying cases. it was a lot of fun. then i was drawn into politics. throughout my career, i have been interested in how to change things for the better. i have been very fortunate to have lots of opportunities to serve. >> you mentioned your mother. your mother died of lung cancer. she was such a force in your life. >> i think it made me very strong because it was very clear i had no one to depend on but me. >> 3 the o
. ackman. >> they also hired shiller, the law firm. not clear why they would hire a law firm at this point. no reason given. they have hired them, which is another, hmm, wonder what they're up to kind of move. bob pisani is on the floor with what's moving today. >> we're up 24 points in the dow. and a lot of people think a grand bargain is impossible at this point. but president obama coming back from vacation in hawaii. that's an indication that some kind of deal -- however small -- is definitely coming. i want to point out, and i know you've been negative on this mastercard data on retail sales, and everybody thinks it's going to be a mess for the holiday season. i want to point out that the stocks are not acting that way. that this is a disaster for the season. the s&p retail index hit an historic high on december 3rd. historic high. since then, it has only been down about 3%. these stocks are not acting like there's a disaster. i can give you several reasons why they're not down so far. number one, we are going to see eps growth in the fourth quarter from some of them because of the ex
him unon violation charges of the country's strict gun laws and since then his parents and lawmakers have been working feverishly to get him out. on friday this marine who served us in iraq and afghanistan and also suffers from prost thattatic stress disorder was greed. he and his dad drove back from florida and hours ago after they arrived home in palmetto bay steve harrigan was live there and had a chance to talk to the dad. steve, how is the family doing tonight? >> jamie, we got to see john hammar pull up with his father after this long ordeal. they drove directly into the garage. john hammar is now suffering from some sort of stomach ailment he picked up inside that mexican prison. they actually had to make a stop on the drive home from the border at a louisiana hospital and john hammar's father says his son is so weak he can barely stand despite that, he says, this will be the greatest christmas his family has ever had. >> i got him in the car and i thanked the u.s. consulate guys and we took off. and made a beeline to san pedro island and spent the night there johnny, while i
for the issues that are bought once the law gets changed? >> nobody knows for sure. that brings up a very important point, which is historically, the treasury department has never imposed taxes on anything retroactively. so this would be a very bad precedent if they decide to apply this to existing bonds that are currently outstanding. what they ought to do is apply this, if they're going to do it, on a foregoing basis, the bonds issued after january 1st, 2013, for example. >> we're showing the picture of the mub, the etf that tracks the municipal bond market. we've seen it decline since the beginning of roughly december. i think a lot of people are concerned about this. but your point is, that perhaps if you buy this year, the treasury would not put taxes on those holdings, correct? which could be a good time to buy muni bonds. >> you're playing a gamble on whether or not the treasury is going to protect you for this year or not. personally, i'm a little bit more worried about the fact that the taxes could apply retroactively. just because of the nature of the way this would work. what's
, and $100 million net worth. >> correct. so big payday for law firm and toyota deal. the big firm, of the winner, hagans berman. do you know them? >> no. >> seattle based law firm that serves as the lead council in the class action set to receive more than $300 million. not bad work if you can get it. >> how much? >> $300 million. taking a third. a little less than a third. >> -- magnetic business cards as the ambulance passes by. >> right. >> i would buy some stock in those today, right? for these guys. you wonder why texas is doing a little built better. because they have put in some rules in place. i'm sorry. >> no. >> you come from a lawyer. >> i do. but we -- my dad doesn't have magnetic business cards. we don't do ambulances. >> no, you were on the good side of things, wasn't he? >> most of the time. >> all right. not all the time? all right. yeah, you did have that sign, i forgot, from the smoker's litigation, where did that -- asbestos? where did that come from? >> the steinway? >> dock workers at four u.s. ports in the pacific northwest will remain on the job despite an o
that mean? freedom of information law. this is information the general public could have obtained on their own. the paper obtained it. finally, listen to this, there is a provision within foia and it says if the government feels request is unduly intrusive or invase i have privacy it could be denied. it was not denied. they gave it to the paper. they published it. jamie: they did not publish all the information. the some information government did not feel was appropriate to release. let me pose this to you, rebecca, this is policy issue rather than legal question. one of the people wrote me back, a friend of mine in texas, a former black hawk pilot, female friend of mind, please publish my address, let robbers know i'm well-armed and locked and loaded. >> that is what she said because she can protect herself. what about all the citizens who have absolute legal right to bear arms who are now basically outed for criminals to come in to attempt to get their firearms? because on the black market, firearms are extremely profitable. i just think it was, irresponsible of the newspaper.
him to invoke federal law in order to invoke a cooling off period. i don't know what the likelihood of that is. i don't know what the president might do. do you think he would -- >> wow. that's a lot of red. >> you step out. you like to step out. you like to make statements, right? >> it's the holidays. >> i'm aware of that. >> you're wearing a red tie today. >> a shirt and a tie. that's usually what i go with, some type of shirt, some type of tie. no bells and whistles. this is your thing. whether you have bracelets -- one of those things is measuring your heart right right now. how is it? >> it's measuring my -- >> your calorie intake? >> my pressure goes up when i'm with you. well, no, this is the jaw bone. >> is it a measure of calories? >> calories, walking, sleeping, rem sleep, how much i shept last night. >> and calories. >> calories. >> if you wore it on your left wrist, would there be less calories, do you know? >> i will test that for you. >> test it out. gasoline prices. you know what i want to ask you? do you employ lobbyists at all? >> no. >> not at all? >> no. >> but w
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)